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About Us

The International Conflict Resolution Center (ICRCenter) is an independent, non-profit think tank committed to the advancement of international dialogue, preservation of territorial sovereignty, and resolution of frozen conflicts in Europe and Eurasia.

Based in Washington, D.C. the Center is dedicated to promoting ideals of self-determination, international legitimacy, and diplomatic confidence in an effort to ensure cooperation and prosperity in the region.

Mission

Mission

The International Conflict Resolution Center (ICR Center) is an independent, non-profit think tank committed to the advancement of international dialogue to resolve frozen conflicts in Europe and Eurasia. The Center promotes self-determination, international legitimacy, and diplomatic confidence in an effort to ensure cooperation and prosperity.

Vision

Vision

International Conflict Resolution Center aims to encourage realistic conversations to highlight and raise the profile of forgotten territorial conflicts in the post-Soviet space. ICR intends to promote the principles of international law and meaningful dialogue to resolve ongoing conflicts. By encouraging confidence between parties and raising relevant issues with the international community, ICR Center expects to contribute to the improvement of international communications, regional development, and restoration of territorial integrity.

Our Team

Clayton
Austin Clayton

Program Director

Soso
Soso Dzamukashvili

Research Assistant

Former Interns

Intern2
Lynn Egami

Lynn Egami is a Cadet and Junior at the United States Military Academy at West Point studying Economics, and International Political Economy, and Systems Engineering. Her work for the ICR Center included focused study of Internally Displaced Persons in frozen conflicts.

Intern3
Claire Dworsky

Claire Dworsky is a Cadet and Junior at the United States Military Academy at West Point studying Cyber Operations. She also has interests in international relations and politics. Her work for the ICR Center included research on the current relations between Moldova and its Russian-suppored breakaway region of Transnistria, as well as Russian ‘passportization’ in similar breakaway regions in Ukraine and Georgia.